The recent ratification of legislation favouring ultraviolet (UV) disinfection methods—in addition to other variables—bodes well for the market, says Frost & Sullivan.

The company’s new analysis, titled Global Ultraviolet Water and Wastewater Disinfection Systems Market, finds that the market earned revenues of US$388.3 million in 2008, and estimates this to reach US$629.8 million in 2015.

Many major cities such as New York, Cincinnati, Paris and Washington D.C. have already installed UV disinfection systems in their water treatment facilities. Likewise, present European legislation such as the Bathing Water Directive and Drinking Water Directive continue to greatly enhance the implementation of UV systems in the wastewater and water treatment segments.

“UV disinfection systems are widely used in industries that employ high-purity water in their manufacturing process,” says Frost & Sullivan research analyst Karthikeyan Ravikumar. “Certain industrial segments such as pharmaceuticals, life science and semiconductors, which prefer non-chemical based disinfection methods, have increased the demand for high-purity water systems and thereby, UV disinfection systems.”

Despite the considerable advantages of UV disinfection systems, the high capital costs of UV, as compared to those of the conventional chlorine-based disinfection methods, have prevented its penetration in price-sensitive markets.

However, says the report, the cost imbalance may be reversing. Several leading nations have recently introduced directives to control the amount of chlorine discharged from wastewater plants. As a result, additional costs to de-chlorinate the water before discharging are incurred, resulting in a substantial increase in the overall cost of chlorine-based disinfection. UV may become the more cost-effective option.

“Additionally, the rising demand and simultaneous scarcity of potable water have led to growing interest in water reuse and recycling in many regions across the globe,” notes Ravikumar. “With UV disinfection forming a very essential part of the water reuse and recycling system, the market is expected to experience increased investments.”

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2 COMMENTS

  1. I first saw this technology on a documentry called “Flow”. It seems like a proven alternative in some developing countries. I want to learn more about it but from what I’ve seen, it seems very promising.

  2. I first saw this technology on a documentry called “Flow”. It seems like a proven alternative in some developing countries. I want to learn more about it but from what I’ve seen, it seems very promising.

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