The Ontario Centre for Environmental Technology Advancement (OCETA) and XPV Capital Corporation, in collaboration with several key organizations (including Water Canada), have released a timely new report that describes how Ontario can become a global leader in the US$400 billion water industry.

Entitled The Water Opportunity for Ontario, the report suggests that by the year 2015, Ontario can be recognized as a global centre of water excellence and world-class provider of technologies, services and know-how for innovative and sustainable water solutions. To achieve this goal, new thinking is required to achieve multiple objectives around protection of the environment and public health; the development and commercialization of new water technologies and products; and the growth of existing and new businesses to create jobs and wealth for Ontario. The report recommends the establishment of a bold vision and strong leadership to make Ontario a global leader; the creation of an Ontario Water Opportunity Act ( recently announced by the Ontario government); increased collaboration amongst government, industry, academia and the public; and branding Ontario as a sustainable water leader.

Environment Minister John Gerretsen said, “Ontario’s goal is to capitalize on the global market for water technology, create jobs and drive water conservation in the province. I’d like to acknowledge this report as an excellent example of how our partners are leading the way in developing the expertise we need to be leaders in water technology. I look forward to reviewing the recommendations and making progress on them with Ontario’s water sector.”

A large number of water ecosystem stakeholders and organizations contributed to the report. These included researchers from leading Ontario universities and colleges; provincial innovation and commercialization organizations; water technology and product developers; municipal and industrial water and wastewater facility operators; engineering services providers; investors and financial institutions; and non-governmental organizations.

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David Henderson of XPV Capital said that “Ontario has demonstrated its ability to develop and grow successful global water technology companies. This is a solid foundation upon which to build—Ontario has the universities, the research base, the talent pool, and the big players. We now have the final ingredient for a successful water technology cluster—the significant economic drivers to push and pull new water technology.”

Kevin Jones of OCETA said that “Ontario should strengthen its support for the testing and demonstration of clean water technologies—this would encourage early adoption of innovative solutions in the marketplace and support the growth of Ontario water technology companies.”

To download a copy of the report, click here.

8 COMMENTS

  1. I is utterly contradictory that Ontario chooses to expend so much manpower and associated financial resources, to become a “World Leader” concerning public water.

    Surely, Ontario Government’s FIRST duty is to provide water supplies to its “customers,” ie: the entire population of the Province, AT PRICES THAT REFLECT REDUCED OPERATING COSTS AND INCREASED MANPOWER AND ASSET PRODUCTIVITIES, THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE’S MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITIES!

    In providing safe water supplies to the public, municipal and provincial governments, surely must FIRST assure that prices charged for water, directly result from maximum productivities of both manpower employed and the assets used, to assure a security of supply of water.

    That duty is not fulfilled, in the direct interest of ALL water customers, whilst the productivity levels of both manpower employed and asserts applied, continue to be low as they clearly t and have been so, for long enough!

    Ontario’s public water utilities are over-manned and thus inefficient in the use assets, such as the revenues and the physical inventories. Ontario’s water customers are paying far more than is necessary for their water supplies. This is as a direct result of these low productivities.

    This fact is combined with water utility managements’ dogged refusals to do anything EFFECTIVE to create increased manpower and asset productivities. It is such water management practices, that prevent governments and politicians from ever resolving this persistent failure to assure the best possible management practices are applied to public water costs and thus to reduce tariffs charged to all customers. For any modern state which persists with such out-moded public water management structures and practices, these facts will remain substantially negative indicator to investors. That fact too, will become increasingly adverse to employment.

  2. I is utterly contradictory that Ontario chooses to expend so much manpower and associated financial resources, to become a “World Leader” concerning public water.

    Surely, Ontario Government’s FIRST duty is to provide water supplies to its “customers,” ie: the entire population of the Province, AT PRICES THAT REFLECT REDUCED OPERATING COSTS AND INCREASED MANPOWER AND ASSET PRODUCTIVITIES, THROUGHOUT THE PROVINCE’S MUNICIPAL WATER UTILITIES!

    In providing safe water supplies to the public, municipal and provincial governments, surely must FIRST assure that prices charged for water, directly result from maximum productivities of both manpower employed and the assets used, to assure a security of supply of water.

    That duty is not fulfilled, in the direct interest of ALL water customers, whilst the productivity levels of both manpower employed and asserts applied, continue to be low as they clearly t and have been so, for long enough!

    Ontario’s public water utilities are over-manned and thus inefficient in the use assets, such as the revenues and the physical inventories. Ontario’s water customers are paying far more than is necessary for their water supplies. This is as a direct result of these low productivities.

    This fact is combined with water utility managements’ dogged refusals to do anything EFFECTIVE to create increased manpower and asset productivities. It is such water management practices, that prevent governments and politicians from ever resolving this persistent failure to assure the best possible management practices are applied to public water costs and thus to reduce tariffs charged to all customers. For any modern state which persists with such out-moded public water management structures and practices, these facts will remain substantially negative indicator to investors. That fact too, will become increasingly adverse to employment.

  3. Hi Rob,

    Interesting views. What do you think about our aging infrastructure, and how raised prices might be a product of needing to replace it, ensuring that we continue to use water not only efficiently, but also safely?

    Kerry

  4. Hi Rob,

    Interesting views. What do you think about our aging infrastructure, and how raised prices might be a product of needing to replace it, ensuring that we continue to use water not only efficiently, but also safely?

    Kerry

  5. perhaps ontario can put more money towards upgrading the sewage systems so that raw sewage is not running into the fresh water supply and polluting the lakes and streams….Ontario and the rest of Canada should create an act called the “Lets clean up our act” ACT. Ontario could set new standards with the support of stakeholders and others knowledge to repair old infrastructure and stop the pollution of industry and other areas of concern

  6. perhaps ontario can put more money towards upgrading the sewage systems so that raw sewage is not running into the fresh water supply and polluting the lakes and streams….Ontario and the rest of Canada should create an act called the “Lets clean up our act” ACT. Ontario could set new standards with the support of stakeholders and others knowledge to repair old infrastructure and stop the pollution of industry and other areas of concern

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