A report from the province released on November 28 said Ontario’s drinking water continues to be among the safest and best protected in the world.

The report comes from Ontario’s Chief Drinking Water Inspector (CDWI), Susan Lo. The duties of the CDWI are to lead activities that ensure regulated drinking water systems across the province meet rigorous, health-cased standards. A geotechnical engineer by training, Lo has held the position since 2013.

The Inspector’s 2015-2016 Annual Report highlighted results for Ontario’s municipal systems, including:

  • 99.8 per cent of drinking water tests from municipal residential drinking water systems met Ontario’s drinking water standards.
  • 74 per cent of all municipal residential drinking water systems achieved a 100 per cent inspection rating — a 7 per cent increase since 2014-2015.
  • 99.6 per cent of drinking water tests from systems serving designated facilities such as daycares, schools or health care centres met Ontario’s drinking water quality standards.

Inspection ratings for municipal drinking water systems have showed a relatively steady improvement over the course of the last ten years. While 2014-2015 showed a slight drop-off from the previous year, the 2015-2016 tests showed an improvement over the last two years.

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According to the province, Ontario has the strongest water source protection program in the country, a program that ensures people continue to have access to clean and safe water in the face of climate change. The province’s drinking water sources, including the Great Lakes, are protected by legislation, stringent regulatory standards, regular and reliable testing and inspections, highly trained operators, and transparent public reporting.

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Almost 60 per cent of Ontarions get their drinking water from the Great Lakes.

The full report is available via the province of Ontario’s website.

Water Canada frequently reports on water issues involving the Great Lakes.

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