Water Canada https://www.watercanada.net From the source to tap and back again Fri, 19 Jul 2019 15:47:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 Canada and Ontario Help Farmers Improve Water Quality https://www.watercanada.net/canada-and-ontario-help-farmers-improve-water-quality/ https://www.watercanada.net/canada-and-ontario-help-farmers-improve-water-quality/#respond Fri, 19 Jul 2019 14:36:40 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062907 The governments of Canada and Ontario are helping more farmers take action to boost water quality in the Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair watersheds. “Our farmers have always been careful stewards of the land and our government is pleased to support them in their actions to protect what matters most, such as water quality […]

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The governments of Canada and Ontario are helping more farmers take action to boost water quality in the Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair watersheds.

“Our farmers have always been careful stewards of the land and our government is pleased to support them in their actions to protect what matters most, such as water quality in the Lake Erie watershed,” said Ernie Hardeman, Ontario’s minister of agriculture, food and rural affairs. “Our government is committed to helping additional farmers make changes through LEADS that will make their operations even more environmentally sustainable.”

Responding to increased demand by farmers interested in taking on projects to reduce phosphorus entering waterways connected to Lake Erie, the governments have increased funding to support their efforts to improve farming methods and better protect the environment.

Through the Lake Erie Agriculture Demonstrating Sustainability (LEADS) initiative, more than 70 additional projects are receiving support – on top of the 270 projects already approved this year.

The governments have committed more than $3.3 million to support completion of these cost-shared projects by farmers. Some examples of LEADS projects include:

  • Planting overwintering cover crops to improve soil health and reduce soil erosion losses.
  • Planting vegetation and trees to provide a buffer between agricultural operations and waterways.
  • Modifying equipment to improve management of agricultural nutrients and to reduce soil compaction.

“The environment is a top priority for our government and we are committed to working with Ontario and its agriculture sector to protect water resources through on-farm environmental actions,” said Marie-Claude Bibeau, minister of agriculture and agri-food. “Through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, we are investing in projects that support the adoption of sustainable practices and contribute to the health of our waterways.”

To date, both the federal and provincial governments have committed cost-share support to more than 1,150 projects through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership to help eligible Ontario farmers, processors, businesses, and sector organizations innovate and grow.

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Canada Invests $3.1 Million in Halifax’s Water and Sewer Services https://www.watercanada.net/canada-invests-3-1-million-in-halifaxs-water-and-sewer-services/ https://www.watercanada.net/canada-invests-3-1-million-in-halifaxs-water-and-sewer-services/#respond Fri, 19 Jul 2019 14:20:55 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062905 The Government of Canada is investing over $3.1 million to provide municipal water and sewer services to more Halifax residents. Federal funding for this project is being provided through the Green Infrastructure Stream of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. The Government of Nova Scotia is contributing $2.6 million, with the Halifax Regional Municipality providing the remainder […]

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The Government of Canada is investing over $3.1 million to provide municipal water and sewer services to more Halifax residents.

Federal funding for this project is being provided through the Green Infrastructure Stream of the Investing in Canada infrastructure plan. The Government of Nova Scotia is contributing $2.6 million, with the Halifax Regional Municipality providing the remainder of project costs.

“Our citizens place great value on clean and efficient water systems, and investments like this make a big difference in the lives of our residents,” said Mike Savage, mayor of the Halifax Regional Municipality. “I want to thank our partners at the federal and provincial government for their contribution to a project that will ensure safe, affordable, and sustainable water systems for years to come.”

This project involves installing 1,500 metres of watermain and 2,200 metres of sanitary sewer to bring municipal water services to residents in the community of Herring Cove. This project will ensure residents who were not served by municipal water infrastructure will have access to high quality drinking water, and an efficient reliable sewer system for generations to come, adapting to the needs of a growing population.

“Investing in high-quality water and wastewater infrastructure is an essential part of building healthy, livable communities,” said Andy Fillmore, Member of Parliament for Halifax. “Our partnership with Nova Scotia and the Halifax Regional Municipality means that residents in Herring Cove will now benefit from efficient water and wastewater services that better serve their community, while supporting future growth and protecting the environment.”

The announcement was made by Andy Fillmore, member of parliament for Halifax, and Brendan Maguire, member of the legislative assembly for Halifax Atlantic.

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Okanagan Water Board Renews Call for Stronger Invasive Mussel Regulations https://www.watercanada.net/okanagan-water-board-renews-call-for-stronger-invasive-mussel-regulations/ https://www.watercanada.net/okanagan-water-board-renews-call-for-stronger-invasive-mussel-regulations/#respond Fri, 19 Jul 2019 13:52:57 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062902 The Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB) is calling for additional regulations to further protect B.C. waters from invasive mussels. “Until we know we are in the clear and there is no chance of invasive mussels making their way into our waters, we are going to be pushing for senior government to do all they can […]

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The Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB) is calling for additional regulations to further protect B.C. waters from invasive mussels.

“Until we know we are in the clear and there is no chance of invasive mussels making their way into our waters, we are going to be pushing for senior government to do all they can to protect our waters,” said Sue McKortoff, chair of OBWB. “Our lakes are not only an important tourist destination, they are important as a source of drinking water, to our fishery and the Okanagan’s delicate ecosystem, and much more.”

As of July 5, the most recent stats available, 384 high-risk watercraft were intercepted coming into B.C. Of these, 35 decontamination orders with quarantine periods were issued to meet the 30-days-out-of-water requirement.

Of the 35 decontaminated for mussels, nine boats and one kayak were found to be carrying adult invasive mussels. The watercraft were coming from Ontario (6), Utah (2), North Carolina (1), and Michigan (1). Two of the 10 were headed to the Okanagan, while the others were destined for Vancouver Island (3), the Lower Mainland (2), the Kootenays (2), and Alaska (1). The program received advance notice from other jurisdictions on eight of the 10 mussel-fouled watercraft.

“It’s wonderful that we have 64 inspectors, three full-status conservation officers who can chase down those who fail to stop at inspection stations, and two K9s to help sniff out mussels,” McKortoff said. “But we only have one of 12 provincial inspection stations that are open 24-hours a day and there is no requirement to get an inspection when a station is closed. We need to tighten things up. This is of paramount importance.”

In particular, the OBWB is repeating its call for legislation requiring that all watercraft entering B.C. be inspected before being allowed to launch in provincial waters. It is also recommending the province implement “pull the plug,” legislation already implemented in Alberta and in Northwest states, requiring drain plugs be removed from watercraft before transport.

OBWB also recommends renewing a public-private partnership between the province and several partners, including BC Hydro and Fortis B.C., which has helped fund the inspection program and expires in early 2021. And finally, the OBWB is calling for the province to increase the program’s funding to at least 2017 levels of $4.45 million to expand and strengthen the program.

For its part, a letter sent by the Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB) to B.C. Minister of Environment and Climate Change George Heyman, the OBWB’s Okanagan WaterWise outreach and education program launched the Don’t Move A Mussel campaign in 2013. Since then, it has spent $327,000 and with support from community partners delivered a campaign worth more than $850,000. It has also provided $195,000 during this time to the Okanagan and Similkameen Invasive Species Society (OASISS) to conduct additional outreach to boaters and water monitoring for mussels.

“According to our research,” the letter continues, “a mussel infestation would cost the Okanagan at least $42 million a year to just manage. As such, since inspection stations were introduced in 2015, our combined efforts have potentially saved more than $168 million in the Okanagan alone.”

“We can’t stop there,” McKortoff said, noting that OBWB-OkWaterWise re-launched an updated Don’t Move A Mussel campaign before the May long-weekend and has been doing public outreach throughout the valley. “The combined programs are great, but they’re not catching everyone as is. We all need to keep pushing forward and making improvements along the way.”

Header image credit: D. Jude from the University of Michigan.

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Doug McNeil Named as Ontario’s Special Advisor on Flooding https://www.watercanada.net/doug-mcneil-named-as-ontarios-special-advisor-on-flooding/ https://www.watercanada.net/doug-mcneil-named-as-ontarios-special-advisor-on-flooding/#respond Fri, 19 Jul 2019 13:28:56 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062900 Doug McNeil has been named Ontario’s special advisor on flooding by the Government of Ontario. The announcement was made by John Yakabuski, minister of natural resources and forestry, and Dr. Merrilee Fullerton, minister of long-term care. “We heard from people across the province and saw first-hand the damage caused by flooding in so many communities,” […]

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Doug McNeil has been named Ontario’s special advisor on flooding by the Government of Ontario. The announcement was made by John Yakabuski, minister of natural resources and forestry, and Dr. Merrilee Fullerton, minister of long-term care.

“We heard from people across the province and saw first-hand the damage caused by flooding in so many communities,” said Minister Yakabuski. “We want to help Ontarians protect what matters most, and the Special Advisor will help better prepare our province for flooding in the future.”

The special advisor will assess current roles and responsibilities of governments, agencies, and organizations involved in flood management, including any opportunities for improvement. He will also review the feedback received, identify focused recommendations, and ensure all recommendations are consistent with the province’s ability to implement them.

In addition to this, the special advisor will build on input from Flooding Engagement Sessions held by the Ontario government earlier this year in Muskoka, Pembroke, and Ottawa to hear from municipalities and industry leaders on how to better prepare for and respond to floods.

Doug McNeil’s Background

Doug McNeil has 36 years in public service with the City of Winnipeg and Province of Manitoba. Positions he has held include: deputy minister of infrastructure and transportation, vice president of engineering and construction, and vice-president of hydraulics with the Manitoba Floodway Authority. McNeil recently retired as chief administrative officer of the City of Winnipeg.

During his career, McNeil has been involved in many aspects of water resource planning, operations, and management, including hydraulics, hydrology, stormwater management, and water control structures. He played key roles in the 1997 “Flood of the Century” on the Red River and led the Floodway Expansion project, which included a provincial review of floodway operating rules and flood protection studies of mitigation measures for Winnipeg.

McNeil holds both Bachelor and Master’s degrees in engineering. He has received numerous distinguished awards related to design and construction of various components of work on Manitoba’s flood structures including the Red River Floodway Expansion Project.

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CEC Receives Submission on Cross Border Water Pollution in Lake Memphremagog https://www.watercanada.net/cec-receives-submission-on-cross-border-water-pollution-in-lake-memphremagog/ https://www.watercanada.net/cec-receives-submission-on-cross-border-water-pollution-in-lake-memphremagog/#respond Wed, 17 Jul 2019 14:20:45 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062895 Memphremagog Conservation Inc. has filed a submission with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) Secretariat. The submission asserts that Canada and the United States are not effectively enforcing the International Boundary Waters Treaty with respect to water pollution in Lake Memphremagog, which straddles the border in southern Quebec and northern Vermont. Memphremagog Conservation Inc. contends that a […]

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Memphremagog Conservation Inc. has filed a submission with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) Secretariat. The submission asserts that Canada and the United States are not effectively enforcing the International Boundary Waters Treaty with respect to water pollution in Lake Memphremagog, which straddles the border in southern Quebec and northern Vermont.

Memphremagog Conservation Inc. contends that a proposed landfill expansion in Coventry County, Vermont will cause water pollution to cross the United States and Canadian border via the lake. This is a concern because water from the lake is used for drinking water by Quebec residents in the province’s Eastern Townships.

The submission also asserts that under applicable Vermont law, the state must ensure that a landfill expansion project will not unduly increase water pollution or the discharge of toxic waste into groundwater. Memphremagog Conservation Inc. is specifically concerned with landfill leachate, which often includes per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), and requests that meaningful studies be carried out before the landfill expansion is approved.

The CEC Secretariat has thirty days to examine the submission and determine whether it satisfies the requirements set forth in Article 14(1) of the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC).

For further information, consult the CEC Submission on Enforcement Matters website and the registry of submission SEM-19-003 (Lake Memphremagog).

Memphremagog Conservation Inc. (MCI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the protection, conservation and improvement of Lake Memphremagog and its watershed for the benefit of present and future generations.

The Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) supports cooperation among the NAFTA partners to address environmental issues of continental concern, including the environmental challenges and opportunities presented by continent-wide free trade.

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Blue Accounting Releases Comprehensive Database of Coastal Wetlands Projects in the Great Lakes Basin https://www.watercanada.net/blue-accounting-releases-comprehensive-database-of-coastal-wetlands-projects-in-the-great-lakes-basin/ https://www.watercanada.net/blue-accounting-releases-comprehensive-database-of-coastal-wetlands-projects-in-the-great-lakes-basin/#respond Wed, 17 Jul 2019 13:24:54 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062893 Blue Accounting has released a comprehensive database of coastal wetlands protection, restoration, and enhancement projects in the Great Lakes Basin. Using the database, decision-makers and stakeholders can view state, federal, provincial, and private investments side-by-side and track progress toward acreage goals identified for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). “The list of organizations that invest […]

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Blue Accounting has released a comprehensive database of coastal wetlands protection, restoration, and enhancement projects in the Great Lakes Basin.

Using the database, decision-makers and stakeholders can view state, federal, provincial, and private investments side-by-side and track progress toward acreage goals identified for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI).

“The list of organizations that invest in and manage coastal wetlands is long and getting longer all the time,” said John Linc Stine, chair of the Great Lakes Commission and executive director of the Minnesota-based Freshwater. “To understand how much progress we are making and where the next investments should be, the Commission and all the investing organizations need a big picture view of the work that is being done across all of these state, provincial, federal, and private partners.”

Blue Accounting worked with the Great Lakes Coastal Assembly to launch the Coastal Wetlands issue on the hub. The Coastal Assembly is a regional partnership of government agencies, nongovernmental organizations and academic researchers dedicated to working together to conserve and restore lands and waters in the critically important coastal zones of the Great Lakes.

“There is a great community of coastal wetlands practitioners and experts around the Basin,” said Michelle Selzer, lake coordinator with the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, and Coastal Assembly member. “These ecosystems not only provide critical habitat, but also buffer our shorelines during storms, filter runoff, and attract tourism. We’re excited to work with Blue Accounting to raise the profile of these important systems and have an accessible, transparent way to track our progress toward protecting, restoring and enhancing them.”

The information hub has interactive maps displaying investments and progress toward GLRI acreage targets.  These maps allow users to filter results by attributes like jurisdiction and congressional district and generate custom tables and graphs. The interface also supports networking by allowing users to access individual project details and contact information.

Going forward, Blue Accounting and the Coastal Assembly will continue to grow the hub’s data sources, with the goal of delivering data from all states, provinces, federal agencies, and private organizations working on coastal wetlands. The suite of goals and metrics tracked will also be expanded to include additional environmental, social, and economic goals and metrics.

“We care about wetland acreage because of the value those acres provide for fish, wildlife, and people,” said Christie Deloria, co-chair of the Great Lakes Coastal Assembly. “I’m excited to begin developing stories and visualizations in the next several months that complement the acreage data and begin showing those values.”

The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) and The Nature Conservancy co-lead Blue Accounting, in partnership with federal, state, provincial, local, and private sector organizations. Blue Accounting receives funding support from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, and the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation.

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Waterfront Toronto Releases 2018-19 Annual Report https://www.watercanada.net/waterfront-toronto-releases-2018-19-annual-report/ https://www.watercanada.net/waterfront-toronto-releases-2018-19-annual-report/#respond Tue, 16 Jul 2019 15:08:44 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062889 Waterfront Toronto has released its 2018-19 Annual Report. The report covers Waterfront Toronto’s activity from April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019 and reflects on the progress made against objectives laid out in its 2018-19 Corporate Plan. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the federal, provincial, and municipal governments coming together and forming the Task Force that recommended […]

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Waterfront Toronto has released its 2018-19 Annual Report. The report covers Waterfront Toronto’s activity from April 1, 2018 to March 31, 2019 and reflects on the progress made against objectives laid out in its 2018-19 Corporate Plan.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the federal, provincial, and municipal governments coming together and forming the Task Force that recommended the creation of Waterfront Toronto. The 2018-19 Annual Report celebrates this milestone by looking back at Waterfront Toronto’s history of placemaking and many of its major achievements – incorporating voices from those who have been instrumental in the progress and success of Toronto’s waterfront.

Since 2001, Waterfront Toronto has received $10 billion in new private sector investment, brought more than 33 major developments to waterfront districts, and created more than 43 hectares of vibrant public parks like Canada’s Sugar Beach.

Although new neighbourhoods have already come to life by the lake, the waterfront is only beginning to show the results of the planning, public consultation, engineering, and infrastructure development work Waterfront Toronto has carried out.

According to Waterfront Toronto, some of its most notable achievements from 2018-19 include:

  • Began heavy excavation on the new mouth of the Don River as part of the Port Lands Flood Protection project.
  • Completed design work for new bridges on Cherry Street and Commissioners Street.
  • Broke ground on the Waterfront Innovation Centre.
  • Completed Phase 1A of the Jack Layton Ferry Terminal Master Plan.
  • Launched the York Street Park and Rees Street Park Design Competition.
  • Began construction on Aitken Place Park.
  • Signed Quayside Plan Development Agreement and rolled out a series of public consultations.
  • Completed 20 pop-up engagements in neighbourhoods across the city, reaching thousands of people and new audiences outside of the central waterfront area.

Waterfront Toronto’s Annual Report for 2018-19 can be found in the document library under Annual Reports.

Header Image Credit: Waterfront Toronto.

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Minister Champagne Issues Statement on CIB’s Investment in Mapleton https://www.watercanada.net/minister-champagne-issues-statement-on-cibs-investment-in-mapleton/ https://www.watercanada.net/minister-champagne-issues-statement-on-cibs-investment-in-mapleton/#respond Tue, 16 Jul 2019 14:08:33 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062887 The Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB) announced on July 15, 2019 that it will be committing up to $20 million for a water and wastewater project in the Township of Mapleton. The investment is expected to expand access to safe drinking water and capacity for the treatment of wastewater for up to 20 years in the Township […]

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The Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB) announced on July 15, 2019 that it will be committing up to $20 million for a water and wastewater project in the Township of Mapleton.

The investment is expected to expand access to safe drinking water and capacity for the treatment of wastewater for up to 20 years in the Township of Mapleton.

François-Philippe Champagne, Canada’s minister of infrastructure and communities, made the following statement on CIB’s announcement.

“We welcome the announcement by the Canada Infrastructure Bank to invest up to $20 million to expand and upgrade the Township of Mapleton’s clean water and wastewater treatment systems.

This investment reflects our government’s priority to invest in modern, green, and resilient public infrastructure that results in cleaner, safer water, and healthier, more livable communities for Canadians. This project will increase access to clean drinking water for Mapleton residents and improve the township’s capacity to treat wastewater to a higher standard, which helps safeguard the health of Mapleton residents and protect the lakes, rivers, and natural environments that they all enjoy.

This investment is the bank’s first initiative that pilots how the bank can support smaller, transformative projects to potentially attract private capital and to advance the new partnership model. By leveraging the capital and expertise of the private sector, the bank enables more infrastructure to be built, contributes to Canada’s long-term economic growth and supports the creation of good, well-paying jobs for the middle class.”

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Greater Napanee Water Pollution Control Plant Receives Federal and Municipal Funding https://www.watercanada.net/greater-napanee-water-pollution-control-plant-receives-federal-and-municipal-funding/ https://www.watercanada.net/greater-napanee-water-pollution-control-plant-receives-federal-and-municipal-funding/#comments Tue, 16 Jul 2019 13:34:40 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062885 The Government of Canada and Town of Greater Napanee announced joint funding to improve and expand the Greater Napanee Water Pollution Control Plant. The Government of Canada is investing more than $14 million through the Rural and Northern Infrastructure stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. The Town of Greater Napanee will be responsible […]

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The Government of Canada and Town of Greater Napanee announced joint funding to improve and expand the Greater Napanee Water Pollution Control Plant.

The Government of Canada is investing more than $14 million through the Rural and Northern Infrastructure stream of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program. The Town of Greater Napanee will be responsible for the remaining costs of the project.

“The sustainability of small town rural communities depends on their infrastructure,” said Mike Bossio, member of parliament for Hastings–Lennox and Addington. “For far too long, our municipalities have not had the support they need to repair and replace aging water and wastewater systems.”

“Not only does this mean that they have had to turn down growth and economic development, but also that our environment has been negatively impacted,” Bossio added. “The funding for Napanee’s wastewater treatment plant demonstrates clearly that the environment and the economy must go together, and I am proud to see Napanee getting the investments it needs for a sustainable future.”

The announcement was made by Mike Bossio, member of parliament for Hastings–Lennox and Addington, and Marg Isbester, mayor of the Town of Greater Napanee.

“The expansion of capacity for our wastewater treatment plant, made possible with this support from the federal government, will allow us to be on an excellent footing for commercial and industrial investment opportunities,” said Marg Isbester, mayor of the Town of Greater Napanee.

“It also is essential in our efforts to improve our environmental outcomes, while conserving energy consumption—something so important for municipal governments, and really all forms of governments,” Isbester added. “I must complement our staff on their hard work and efforts to supply design and financial information to secure this support. Countless hours have been put in by the staff on both ends of this infrastructure injection.”

With the existing control plant currently operating at 94 per cent capacity, improvements and expansion of the existing facilities’ system will allow for more advanced treatment, and allow the plant meet increasing demands in the future.

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Is Energy Neutrality Worth It? https://www.watercanada.net/feature/is-energy-neutrality-worth-it https://www.watercanada.net/feature/is-energy-neutrality-worth-it#respond Mon, 15 Jul 2019 23:22:39 +0000 https://www.watercanada.net/?p=5000062882 This was one of the questions that Medhavi Gupta, a water design specialist a Jacobs Canada, explored as part of a research project that assessed the energy consumption of different primary wastewater treatment technologies. Gupta presented the findings of her research, which she undertook with Western University and Trojan Technologies, at the International Water Association’s […]

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This was one of the questions that Medhavi Gupta, a water design specialist a Jacobs Canada, explored as part of a research project that assessed the energy consumption of different primary wastewater treatment technologies.

Gupta presented the findings of her research, which she undertook with Western University and Trojan Technologies, at the International Water Association’s Young Professionals Conference. The event took place from June 23-37, 2019 in Toronto Ontario.

Gupta tested four scenarios using wastewater collected from the Pottersburg Wastewater Treatment Plant in London, Ontario. These included:

  • Raw wastewater treatment (no primary)
  • Rotating belt filter
  • Chemically enhanced rotating belt filter
  • Primary clarifier

She found that the scenario with the chemically enhanced rotating belt filter was the most energy positive scenario because it had the lowest aeration demand and the highest amount of methane energy recovered.

Sequential Batch Reactors for Nitrification and Denitrification

Gupta also used sequential batch reactors (SBRs) during the testing to help with nitrification and denitrification. She found that total nitrogen removal (TN) averaged:

  • 54 per cent for the raw wastewater scenario.
  • 45 per cent for the rotating belt filter scenario.
  • 30 per cent for the chemically enhanced rotating belt filter scenario.
  • 29 per cent for the primary clarifier scenario.

Conclusions

Some of the main conclusions of Gupta’s research include:

  • The “rotating belt filter offers an alternative to primary clarifiers.”
  • “Excessive carbon removal by a chemically-enhanced rotating belt filter can compromise overall nitrogen removal.”
  • A chemically enhanced rotating belt filter is an ideal option for carbon diversion in scenarios, such as anammox, that have a low chemical oxygen demand to nitrogen ratio.

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